Monday, December 14, 2015

Tung Fort | तुंग किल्ला

Tung Fort (or Kathingad; difficult fort in Marathi) is a hill fort in Pune District, India.

Location

It is about 12 km from Malawli railway station and can also be approached from Lonavala. Tung Fort has an elevation of 1075 m above sea level.[2] Since Pawna dam was built, it is now surrounded by water on three sides. One can ferry across in a boat from Pawna dam to its base village, Tungi.
Tung fort is also named as Kathingad fort. The word "Kathin" in Marathi means difficult. While climbing, one can experience the difficult challenge of reaching this fort. The fort is conical and has steep climbs with a very narrow route on the edge of the mountain throughout. From Pawana dam, reaching this fort requires a 400-metre climb.
From Lonavala, one can reach the base village Tungwadi around 20 km via Bushy Dam-INS Shivaji-Peth Shahapur-Tungwadi. From Tungwadi village, reaching this fort requires about a 300-metre climb.

History

Tung Fort was built before 1600 CE. It was built by the Adil Shahi dynasty but was captured by Shivaji.[3] It is small, and not able to hold more than 200 troops at a time. As such, it would not have been able to defend itself on its own for a long time. Its shape and structure suggest that its main function was as a watchtower guarding the road to Pune city. The Dhamale family, one of the Deshmukh from the Maval region, was charged with ensuring the security of Tung Fort. During invasion, it served to provide a temporary distraction for invaders. Thus, the major forts of Visapur and Lohagad would have time to prepare themselves to meet the invading army.[4] This fort served as a watchtower in the past because from top of the fort, a lot of area in the Maval region of the Pawana and Mulshi valleys can be seen, and thus, from the top of the fort, a watch on these areas can be kept.

Major features

Its sharp, conical peak makes Tung Fort a prominent landmark, even from a distance. It has an oval shape, thick walls and numerous bastions. A steep climb on grassy slopes leads to the ruins of a temple at the summit. A rocky staircase leads several feet down to a water reservoir. From the top of the fort, the Lohagad, Visapur, Tikona and Korigad forts are clearly visible.

Source: merwynsrucksack.blogspot.in
Map:
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Kenjalgad Fort | केंजळगड




 Kenjalgad or Ghera Khelanja Fort, (Wai Taluka) 4,269 feet above sea level, is situated on the Mandhardev spur of the Mahadev range eleven miles north-west of Wai. It is a flat-topped hill of an irregular oval shape, about 250 yards long and one hundred yards wide at the extremes, looking remarkably strong both from a far and near. But on ascending it is found to be commanded by the Yeruli Asre and Doicivadi plateaus about two miles to the east which are easily ascended from the Wai side, and the Jambli hills about a mile to the west. The fort forms a village in itself but has to be ascended from the villages of Asre or Khavli which lie at its foot on the Wai side. The ascent is by about two miles of a very steep climb or the Asre-Titeghar bridle path can be followed for two miles and then a tolerably easy path leads due west from the pass another mile on to the fort. The fort is a black scarp rising vertically from the main ridge which is hogbacked. The scarp is one of the highest in any of the Satara forts and reaches in places eighty to a hundred feet. The only entrance is on the north side up a set of a hundred steps running parallel to the line of the scarp till within four or seven feet of the top, when they turn at right angles to it and cut straight into a passage leading on to the top. The steps are peculiarly imposing and differ from any others in the district. Thus on entering, the scarp is on the left and there is nothing on the right till the passage is reached, and invaders ascending would be liable to be hurled back over the cliff. At the foot of the steps is a bastion which evidently flanked a gateway. There are remains of six large and three small buildings, all modern. The head-quarters or kacheri is only marked by a large fig tree. The only building thoroughly recognizable is the powder magazine on the west which is about thirty feet square with strong stone walls three feet thick and seven feet high and three feet of brick on the top. The walls of the fort were originally of large square cut blocks of unmortared stone, but were afterwards added to in many places.

They are in most places fully four feet thick and including the rampart about eight feet thick. There was a parapet of lighter work mostly ruined. The fort has three large water tanks about forty feet square and six small ones for storage of water and grain. But there is no living spring inside the fort. The largest tank is in the southern face and is quite thirty feet deep. The tanks were emptied when the fort was dismantled by blowing up the outer sides which were formed by the ramparts and letting the water empty itself down the hill side. On the west is a sort of nose projecting beyond and a little lower than the main ridge of the fort, also strongly fortified. There is a narrow promenade on the ridge at the foot of the scarp and on the north side is a large cave with excellent water and partly used for storage purposes. The village lies about 300 feet below on a ledge of the northern hill slope. To its immediate west is a dense temple grove of jambhul and anjan. The village of Voholi, on the north side of this range, the inhabitants of which were part of the hereditary garrison, is in a hollow to the north-west. Khelanja fort is said to have been built by the Bhoj Rajas of Panhala who flourished in the twelfth century. Its remarkable strength was noticed by Mr. Elphinstone who says it could scarcely be taken if resolutely defended. The guns on the Kenjalgad fort opened fire before surrendering to the detachment sent by General Pritzler up the Wai valley about the 26th of March 1818.

 

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Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Tikona fort | तिकोना गड




















Tikona (Marathi: तिकोना) also known as Vitandgad) is the dominant hill fort in Maval in western India. It is located near Kamshet around 60 km from Pune. The village nearest to the fort is called Tikona-Peth. The 3500 ft high hill is pyramidal in shape and the name Tikona means "triangle".
The fort is a trekking destination noted for the large doors, the temple of 'Trimbakeshwar Mahadev', a water tanks (seven water tanks) and some Satvahan caves. Trek organisers also commend the views of Pawna dam and the nearby forts of Tung, Lohagad and Visapur. There is Pawana lake at the summit.

History

Little is known about the origins of this fort. There is a vihara on the fort datable to circa seventh-eight centuries A.D.[2] Malik Ahmad Nizam Shah I of the Nizam Shahi dynasty conquered the fort in 1585 and annexed it to the Nizam territory. In 1657, Shivaji Maharaj brought the whole of Konkan, which had been Nizam territory, under his control when he conquered Tikona along with the forts of Karnala, Lohgad, Mahuli, Songad, Tala, and Visapur. This fort was a strategic nexus: the centre of control for the entire Pawana Mawal region. In 1660, Dhamale family, the Deshmukhs from Maval region were charged with ensuring the security of fort Tikona. Jaysingh invaded the region in 1665 and attacked the local villages but the forts held out. Tikona fort was surrendered to the Mughal warrior Kubadkhan, who had attacked the region together with Halal Khan and others, according to the Treaty of Purandar signed on 12 June 1665. Kubad Khan took over the fort on 18 June but it was later recaptured by the Marathas.

Sources:
thedriftingwanderers.blogspot.in
maajhibhatkanti.wordpress.com
kevinstandagephotography.wordpress.com
adidatar.files.wordpress.com
trekkerpedia.com
Map:
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Thursday, October 1, 2015

kothaligad | कोथळीगड



Kothaligad (also called Kotligad or Kothligad) is a small Fort (3100 ft) is situated to the east of Karjat near Karjat-Murbad Road in the Indian state of Maharashtra. It is one of the famous treks in the Karjat area, because of its small height and easy climbing. It is also known as the Fort of Peth because of its vicinity to Peth village at its base.

Features

There is a small temple and large cave at the base and a chimney like tunnel to the top of the fort. This pinnacle is carved from inside forming a staircase reaching the top. There is a tank of water at some distance from the cave and another one at the top of the fort. The stone is a single black expanse reaching till the Peth village standing on the fertile soil with abundant natural resources for water and farming.

History

The cave and the temple carvings date back to the 13th century. Not much is known about the history until the 18th century. In 1716, this cave was captured by the British. Then later on, on November 2, 1817, it was recaptured by the Marathas under the leadership of Bapurao who belonged to the generation after Bajirao. It was recaptured by the British, on December 30, 1817, the very next month, under Captain Brooks. The British had the fort till 1862 as an outpost for vigilance on the surrounding valley and the hills all around it.
The locals say that this is not actually a fort but a sort of lighthouse from where the directions were given to know the advancements of the enemy. In fact, it can be called a watch tower to keep a vigil on the Mawal area in the greater province of the Marathas.






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Friday, September 25, 2015

harihar fort | हरिहर गड


Harihar fort appears to be rectangular in shape from its base village. It is built on a triangular prism of rock. Its three faces and two edges are absolutely vertical (90 degrees). The third edge towards the west is inclined at an angle of 75 degrees. A one metre wide rocky staircase with niches in it is carved out for ascending & descending the fort. There are 117 steps in all. After you climb the first rocky staircase (main entrance) we walk thru below a overhang with a sheer drop. Again one has to climb a set of steep stairs (with niches), then pass thru a staircase inside the rock (like Peth-kothligad fort) and then reach the top of the fort. The view from the top is excellent. After climbing these steps, we get up to the entrance door. The fort has got a tapering plateau with a raised level in the middle. There is a small temple of Lord Hanuman and Lord Shiva on the plateau. A small pond is there in front of this temple. Water from this pond can be used for drinking. Making headway from here we come across a palace having two rooms in it. 10 to 12 persons can be accommodated in this palace. One of the vertical drops of the fort facing the Nirgudpada village is called 'Scottish kada', perhaps because it was climbed for the first time in November 1986 by Doug Scott, the legendary Himalayan mountaineer & took him two days to do the climb. This cliff is about 170 meters in height.


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